Deep Dive on Behavior Science Applied to Clean Cooking : The Hidden Side of Energy Access 2.0 (Self-paced)
Self-Paced eLearning

Deep Dive on Behavior Science Applied to Clean Cooking : The Hidden Side of Energy Access 2.0 (Self-paced)

This e-course aims to deepen key learnings from the introductory course and to highlight Behavior Science, a core and innovative aspect of the clean cooking sector, in a more focused way. It aims to provide an opportunity for donors, clients, practitioners to conduct a deep dive on Modern Energy Cooking Services (MECS). Best practices in terms of methods and tools used for behavioral diagnostic and testing of solutions will be made available. Participants will be engaged in various interactive exercises, readings, and quizzes throughout the learning series.

Photo credits: Karthick Prabakar
Name of the copyright owner: Inclusive Energy Ltd

Join the Discussion

Clemence

- Sep 23, 2022
Dear Clinton, dear Dr Alex. Thank you for engaging with us and for your interest in the course. Indeed, social norms and traditions can be a major obstacle to clean cooking adoption and sustained use. Clinton, I am sorry to hear about your friend, challenging deeply rooted beliefs is a major obstacle to address! As a French national, I don’t have examples of how social norms and culture can prevent clean cooking access. Nevertheless, we invite you the join the Clean Cooking Community of Practice on Linkedin and to post your questions on the group (link: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/14012955/). This group reunites clean cooking experts, practitioners, or people interested in the topic. It is a space to exchange best practices, share knowledge and job opportunities, network and inquire. Your comments are very interesting and would receive great attention from CoP members!

Clinton

- Sep 6, 2022
Clean Cooking other than using Firewood. Wood fuel such as firewood and charcoal has been an important energy source for cooking in Uganda, but why are they being used up-to now, are we telling the story better about clean cooking to the nation, different cultures on African Continent are still backwards simply because we don’t tell the story rightly, Many Ugandan stews banana pills over a charcoal stove no bigger than a small stool as generations before them have done. “they sometimes cook with firewood. If they have money, they always buy charcoal,” they say, unaware that both fuels are clogging up their lungs. I became an environmentalist practitioner after loosing one of my friends who used to heat her food over smoky fire. Villages in Uganda nine out of ten people cook with dirty fuel, such as wood, charcoal or kerosene. My Questions are! Are we speaking right to the end user! Are we demonstrating the benefits of Modern Energy Cooking Services (MECS)well! after enrolling them, do they have access to clean cooking replacements, might be a gap with Route to market (RTM).

Clemence

- Sep 23, 2022
We invite you the join the Clean Cooking Community of Practice on Linkedin and to post your questions on the group (link: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/14012955/). his group reunites clean cooking experts, practitioners or people interested in the topic. It is a space to exchange best practices, share knowledge and job opportunities, network and inquire.

Nduhura

- Sep 5, 2022
Social norms can disrupt transiation to clean cooking indeed. For exmaple in Uganda and specifically among Banyankore in Western Uganda there is a belief that a millet meal cannot be cooked well with gas but rather with firewood and charcoal! Any examples from your country?

Clemence

- Sep 23, 2022
We invite you the join the Clean Cooking Community of Practice on Linkedin to learn more about to which extent social norms impact clean cooking adoption (link: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/14012955/).
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