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Beyond Business as Usual: What Will it Take to End Extreme Poverty by 2030?

"The rate of poverty reduction is slowing, which makes us realize that what got us here may not get us there..."

Alternative and innovative ways to maintain momentum toward achieving the twin goals of ending extreme poverty and shared prosperity by 2030.

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Opening Remarks: The rate of poverty reduction is slowing, which makes us realize that what got us here may not get us there...

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Productivity in the Informal Sector - 60% of the people in the developing world are strugglers, making $4-10 a day, and those at the lower end are at a very high probability of falling back below $4 a day. How do you raise productivity for people in the informal sector, especially non-farm and non-factory workers?

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Aspirations and Agency - How can we harness people's aspirations and restore a sense of agency that gives people the power to change their own lives? How can we re-shape narratives around the World Bank programs in order to communicate effectively about the root causes of poverty? 

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Development Policies for the Poorest - Development policies do not reach the poor. Rising inequality is decelerating the process. The poorest of the poor are just as poor now as they were 30 years ago. How can development policies reach them? 

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Beyond Credit Interventions - It is difficult to tax when household consumption per capita is only $10. What are the interventions beyond making credit available? 

Women and Social Attitudes - How does a 15-year-old girl see as the ecosystem that will determine her reproductive choices? How do you address social attitudes?

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A Gender Lens - What are the different constraints in different countries? How can societies and an economy be efficient if the reason why children have an opportunity depends on who their parents were? 

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Strugglers versus Extreme Poor  - Why are we succeeding in helping the extremely poor but not necessarily succeeding in helping the poor move into the middle class? How can we design policy responses to increase growth and productivity? 

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Tax Evasion, Justice, and Inequity - Africa loses twice as much in tax evasion than that it gets as international aid. How can we get companies and individuals to pay taxes to ensure these taxes are spent on ending extreme poverty and moving poor to the middle class? How do we overcome the issues of injustice and inequity? 

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Gains from International Migration - What responsibilities and actions can governments in rich and well-off countries take that are far more than providing aid, such as the prospects and gains of freeing up international migration?

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Poverty and Growth within the FCV Context - How can we make progress on extreme poverty by 2030 in Fragility, Conflict, and Violence (FCV) countries? What are the prospects about growth while we grapple with trade wars, slowing productivity, and environmental issues? 

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Market Power and Technology - How do we narrow down the discrepancies between productivity growth and wage growth? 

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Closing Remarks - Making migration popular, measures to implement justice, rising inequality, tax mobilization, and climate change. 

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Addressing the slowing prospects for growth - What is it that we need to do differently? What do we need to focus on? What are the blind spots?

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Governance, Digital Finance, and Gender - What concrete steps is the World Bank taking to address the slowing global growth in client countries? 

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Structural Reforms, Growth Policies, and Tradeoffs: What is the connection between the work we do at not just the country level but also at the regional and global levels?

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Agriculture versus Manufacturing and Service Jobs - How important is the agriculture pathway for eradicating poverty and increasing income, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa?

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Industrial Policy, Growth & Inequality, and Skills - How should we engage differently with countries such as Vietnam to focus more on moving people to middle incomes without sacrificing the broader goal of reducing poverty?

About the Presenters

Nancy Birdsall

President Emeritus and Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development

Nancy Birdsall is president emeritus and a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, a policy-oriented research institution that opened its doors in Washington, DC in October 2001. Prior to launching the Center, Birdsall served for three years as senior associate and director of the Economic Reform Project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Her work at Carnegie focused on issues of globalization and inequality, as well as on reforming international financial institutions. Birdsall was the executive vice-president of the Inter-American Development Bank. Before joining the IADB, she spent 14 years in research, policy, and management positions at the World Bank. Birdsall is the author, co-author, or editor of more than a dozen books and monographs, and author of over 100 published papers. Her most recent work focuses on global governance and the international financial institutions, women’s empowerment and its relationship to reproductive choices, and the financing of global public goods for development.

Pedro Conceição

Director, Human Development Report Office, UNDP

Pedro Conceição is the lead author of UNDP’s Human Development Report. Prior, he served as Director, Strategic Policy, at the Bureau for Policy and Programme Support (from October 2014), and Chief Economist and Head of the Strategic Advisory Unit at the Regional Bureau for Africa (from 1 December 2009). Before that, he was Director of the Office of Development Studies (ODS) from March 2007 to November 2009, and Deputy Director of ODS, from October 2001 to February 2007. His work on financing for development and on global public goods was published by Oxford University Press in books he co-edited (The New Public Finance: Responding to Global Challenges, 2006; Providing Global Public Goods: Managing Globalization, 2003). He has published on inequality, the economics of innovation and technological change, and development in several journals. Prior to joining to UNDP, he was an Assistant Professor at the Instituto Superior Técnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal.

Anandi Mani

Professor of Behavioural Economics and Public Policy, Oxford University

Anandi Mani is Professor of Behavioural Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government. Her research interests are in the area of development economics, with a specific focus on issues related to the behavioral economics of poverty and social exclusion, gender issues and public good provision. She is a Research Affiliate at Ideas42, a think tank for behavioral economics at Harvard University, and a Fellow at the Centre for Comparative Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) at the University of Warwick. Her recent work has been published in prominent economics journals and has also featured in leading newspapers including The New York Times and The Guardian, as well as the BBC. Professor Mani was a program participant at the World Economic Forum 2017 in Davos and is a member of the Forum's Global Council on the Future of Behavioral Sciences.

Martin Ravallion

Edmond D. Villani Professor of Economics, Georgetown University

Martin Ravallion holds the inaugural Edmond D. Villani Chair of Economics at Georgetown University. Prior to joining Georgetown in 2013 he was Director of the World Bank’s research department, the Development Research Group. Martin worked in almost all sectors and regions of the World Bank for over 24 years. Prior to joining the Bank, he was on the faculty of the Australian National University. He has taught economics at L.S.E., Oxford University, the Australian National University, Princeton University and the Paris School of Economics. Martin’s main research interests over the last 30 years have concerned poverty and policies for fighting it.