Bite+

Are Robots Coming for your Job?

"What can workers in developing countries expect?"

Robots, AI and other technological advances are partly responsible for the loss of manufacturing jobs in advanced countries. Many more types of jobs are expected to be affected in the future. What can workers in developing countries expect?

VIDEO

"How are our researchers looking at the potential effects of Robots, AI and other technological advances in developing countries?"  - Zubedah Robinson, External Affairs Associate, World Bank Group:

VIDEO

"How do we make sure we create 600 million jobs for the people entering the workforce in developing countries for the next 15 years?" Ceyla Pazarbasioglu, Vice President for Equitable Growth, Finance, and Institutions, World Bank Group

VIDEO

"Are robots joining human workers in the workplace or replacing them?" - Bill Maloney, Chief Economist for Equitable Growth, Finance, and Institutions, World Bank Group

VIDEO

"Does automation in rich countries hurt developing ones?" - Mary Hallward-Driemeier, Senior Economic Advisor, Equitable Growth, Finance, and Institutions, World Bank Group

VIDEO

"What are the policy implications of automation through the lens of mobility, migration, training and so on across countries? What are the implications for people moving across skills and sectors? Aart Kraay, Director for Development Economics Group, World Bank

VIDEO

"Does automation in rich countries hurt developing countries? In which of the sectors have robots been used widely? What are the trends both in the U.S. and globally?" - Bob Rijkers, Senior Economist for Trade and International Integration, World Bank and Hernan Winkler, Senior Economist for Human Development, World Bank

VIDEO

"Can we learn about the effects of other technologies on jobs while studying the potential implications of AI on jobs? What is so special about the automobile industry and its likelihood to automate when compared to other industries? " -  Caroline Freund, Global Director for Trade, Investment, and Competitiveness, World Bank Group

VIDEO

"Particularly in Low-Income Countries, will technology impact service jobs? What is going to happen to wages? What is happing on the ground? What is keeping people up at night?" -  Noreyana Fernando, External Affairs Associate, World Bank Group

VIDEO

What skills would human workers need to work peacefully alongside robots? - Amy Wright, Managing Partner for Talent & Transformation at Global Business Services, IBM and Susan Lund, Partner at the McKinsey Global Institute, McKinsey & Company

VIDEO

What is the optimistic side while preparing for the skills of the future? How can developing countries move faster towards automation? Why are managers more likely to be replaced?Lynn Wu, Assistant Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions, Wharton School of Business and Robert Atkinson, Founder and President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

VIDEO

What are the challenges and opportunities for women? Can automation have an impact on the gender division of labor? 

VIDEO

What can organizations like the World Bank do in advanced economies to be prepared for the future of work? 

VIDEO

Closing Remarks by Bill Maloney, Chief Economist for Equitable Growth, Finance, and Institutions, World Bank Group

About the Presenters

Lynn Wu

Assistant Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions, Wharton School of Business

Lynn Wu is an assistant professor at the Wharton School. She is interested in studying how emerging information technologies, such as artificial intelligence and analytics, affect innovation, business strategy, and productivity. Specifically, her work follows three streams. In the first stream, she examines how data analytics and artificial intelligence affect firm innovation, business strategy, labor demand, and productivity for both large firms and startups. In her second stream, she studies enterprise social media and information derived from online platforms affect individuals’ work performance, career trajectories, and examine new type of biases that arise from using technologies. In her third stream of research, Lynn leverages fine-grained nanodata available through online digital traces to predict economic indicators such as real estate trends, labor trends and product adoption.

 

 

Ceyla Pazarbasioglu

Vice President for Equitable Growth, Finance, and Institutions, World Bank Group

Ceyla Pazarbasioglu is Vice President for Equitable Growth, Finance and Institutions at the World Bank Group. In this role, she provides strategic leadership to the best expertise from the World Bank and International Finance Corporation to help developing countries build the foundations for inclusive and sustainable growth. She is a former Deputy Director, Monetary and Capital Markets, at the International Monetary Fund; and Vice President of the Banking Regulation and Supervision Agency, Turkey.

William (Bill) Maloney

Chief Economist for Equitable Growth, Finance, and Institutions, World Bank Group

William F. Maloney is Chief Economist for Equitable Growth, Finance and Institutions in the World Bank Group.  Previously he was Chief Economist for Trade and Competitiveness and Global Lead on Innovation and Productivity.  Prior to the Bank, he was a Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (1990-1997) and then joined, working as Lead Economist in the Office of the Chief Economist for Latin America until 2009.  From 2009 to 2014, he was Lead Economist in the Development Economics Research Group. From 2011 to 2014 he was Visiting Professor at the University of the Andes and worked closely with the Colombian government on innovation and firm upgrading issues. Mr. Maloney received his PhD in economics from the University of California Berkeley (1990), his BA from Harvard University (1981), and he studied at the University of the Andes in Bogota, Colombia (1982-83). 

Susan Lund

Partner at the McKinsey Global Institute, McKinsey & Company

Susan Lund is a partner at McKinsey & Company and a leader of the McKinsey Global Institute, based in Washington, DC. She is an expert on global labor markets and trade. Her latest research analyzed the effects of automation and artificial intelligence on the future of work and workforce skills in the United States and Europe. Recent research assessed how new technologies and shifts in demand are impacting global trade and value chains; provided new evidence on the size and motivations of the gig economy and independent work; and quantified the potential economic impact of digital finance and mobile money in developing countries. Susan has a PhD in applied economics from Stanford University and a BA in economics from Northwestern University. She has lived and worked in Africa and Asia and currently resides in Washington DC.

 

Mary Hallward Driemeier

Senior Economic Advisor, Equitable Growth, Finance, and Institutions, World Bank Group

Mary Hallward-Driemeier is a Senior Economic Adviser in the Finance, Competitiveness & Innovation (FCI) Global Practice at the World Bank Group, overseeing the analytical agenda on issues of private sector development, technology and productivity.  A Canadian national, she joined the World Bank in 1997 as a Young Professional. She has published widely on entrepreneurship, firm productivity and firm dynamics, the impact of financial crises, and women's economic empowerment.  She has served as an advisor to the Chief Economist of the World Bank, a co-manager of the Jobs Group, the Deputy Director for the World Development Report 2005:  A Better Investment Climate for Everyone and is a founding member of the Microeconomics of Growth Network. Her latest book is Trouble in the Making? The Future of Manufacturing-Led Development. Mary received her M.Sc. in Development Economics from Oxford University where she was a Rhodes Scholar and her Ph.D. in Economics from M.I.T.
 

Aart Kraay

Director for Development Economics Group, World Bank

Aart Kraay is Director of Research in the Development Research Group at the World Bank. He joined the World Bank in 1995 after earning a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University (1995), and a B.Sc. in economics from the University of Toronto (1990). His research interests include international capital movements, growth and inequality, governance, and the Chinese economy. His research on these topics has been published in scholarly journals such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Economic Journal, the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Journal of International Economics, and the Journal of the European Economic Association. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Development Economics, and co-editor of the World Bank Economic Review. He has also held visiting positions at the International Monetary Fund and the Sloan School of Management at MIT, and has taught at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University.
 

 

Amy Wright

Managing Partner for Talent & Transformation at Global Business Services, IBM

As the Managing Partner for IBM’s Talent & Transformation business, Amy is responsible for bringing innovative services and software to IBM clients to help with the transformation of talent across the business enterprise and the reinvention of the Human Resources (HR) function. IBM is in a unique position to work with clients at this game changing moment-in-time, serving as a real-life example of accelerating enterprise transformation through its own HR journey, which incorporates Augmented Intelligence (AI) technology advancements, skills shifts and new ways of working. 
Amy is the co-author of IBM’s Institute of Business Value’s “The enterprise guide to closing the skills gap – Strategies for building and maintaining a skilled workforce” report that was released in September 2019. She regularly speaks on IBM’s research on HR in the age of AI, closing the skills gap, employee engagement, and culture change

 

Hernan Winkler

Senior Economist for Human Development, World Ban

Hernan Winkler is a labor economist in the World Bank’s Jobs Group. His research focuses on how labor markets cope with disruption, including technological shocks. He also has experience on the political economy of reforms and the drivers and consequences of income inequality. He led the regional report Reaping Digital Dividends: Leveraging the Internet for Development in Europe and Central Asia. His work has been published in leading academic journals. He holds a PhD in Economics from UCLA.
 

 

Caroline Freund

Caroline Freund, Global Director for Trade, Investment, and Competitiveness, World Bank Group

Caroline Freund is Global Director of Trade, Investment and Competitiveness. Previously she was a Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.  She has also worked as Chief Economist for the Middle East and North Africa at the World Bank, after working for nearly a decade in the international trade unit of the research department.  Freund began her career in the international finance division of the Federal Reserve Board and spent a year visiting the research department of the IMF.  She has published extensively in academic journals including: American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of International Economics and is the author of Rich People Poor Countries: The Rise of Emerging Market Tycoons and their Mega Firms. She received a PhD in economics from Columbia University.
 

Robert Atkinson

Founder and President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Dr. Robert D. Atkinson is one of the country’s foremost thinkers on innovation economics.  He has conducted ground-breaking research on technology and innovation and authored three books, including Big is Beautiful: Debunking the Mythology of Small Business (MIT Press, 2018). As founder and president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), recognized as the world’s top think tank for science and technology policy, Atkinson leads a prolific team of policy analysts and fellows that is successfully shaping the debate and setting the agenda on a host of critical issues at the intersection of technological innovation and public policy.
 

Bob Rijkers

Senior Economist for Trade and International Integration, World Bank

Bob Rijkers is a Senior Economist in the Trade and International Integration Unit of the Development Research Group. He is interested in political economy, trade, and labor market issues. His research has been published in journals such as The Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of International Economics, and Journal of Human Resources and featured in media such as the Economist, the New York Times, and The Financial Times. He holds a BA in Science and Social Sciences from University College Utrecht, Utrecht University and an M.Phil. and D.Phil. in Economics from the University of Oxford.